About the CRFR Conference


Due to high demand, the abstract submission date has been extended to 30 September 2019.

The concept of ‘intersectionality’ is an increasingly widely used way in which researchers and others attempt to grapple with the ways in which intersecting systems of oppression (e.g. sexism, racism and others) affect people.   

The concept can be traced to the activism of black feminists in the USA who highlighted the different experiences of women of colour – affected as they were by the intersection of both racism and sexism.  

For our sixth international conference, we will explore how families and personal relationships are implicated in a range of intersections: both as systems through which oppression may circulate, and as sites of resistance and transformation.  

Leading social theorist and activist Patricia Hill Collins will open the conference, providing the platform for an exciting and vibrant dialogue on how intersectionality, past and present, can deepen our understandings of families and relationships and the power relations within.   

The conference will be held over three days at the University of Edinburgh’s John McIntyre Centre, which sits in the shadow of ‘Arthur’s Seat’ an extinct volcano, close to Edinburgh’s historic old town.  

Papers are welcome both from academics across disciplines, and those in non-academic practice or policy settings.    

Contributions can address any aspect of the ways in which intimate relationships (including, but not restricted to, families, friendships, parent-child relationships, sibling or kin relationships, couples, sexual relationships) are implicated in fighting against or colluding with systems of oppression, injustice or inequality. This might, for example, include how families or friendship groups form gendered and racially mixed or segregated communities of practice whose cultures may transmit either racism, or racial literacy and feminist informed anti-racist activism. Contributions could inquire into the use of intersectionality in diverse global contexts – enrolled in different ways, with diverse effects, in responding to, for instance, sexual health and reproductive rights.  

Although we take it for granted that race, gender and class are fundamental inequalities in multiple contexts, participants can also foreground inequalities in other domains such as religion, sexuality, dis/ability, age or life stages such as childhood and older age, nationality, and ethnicity. Given the increasing threat of climate change, we would particularly welcome contributions focused on the ways intersectionality, families and relationships impinge on concern for or neglect of environmental issues, including the implications of global warming for future generations and distant strangers.

Roads

Conference themes

Contributions may include, but are not limited to, the role of intersectionality in families and / or relationships in the following areas:

RACE & ETHNICITY

SEXUALITY & GENDER

SOCIAL CLASS AND INEQUALITIES

INTERSECTIONAL CHILDHOODS & YOUTHS

SPATIAL MOBILITIES, FAMILIES & COMMUNITY

DISABILITY STUDIES

HEALTH & ILLNESS

OLDER PEOPLE

ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY & CLIMATE CHANGE

INTERSECTIONALITY, PRACTICE & PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVES

INTERSECTIONAL METHODS & ETHICAL ISSUES

DIGITAL DOMAINS, INTERSECTIONALITY, FAMILIES AND RELATIONSHIPS

REGISTER

YOUR PLACE

To encourage participation, we are offering a tiered fee structure, with reduced registration fees for delegates from low or middle-income countries (LMIC), upper middle-income countries (UMIC) as well as for student and CRFR associate researchers.

Early bird conference rates include entry to all conference sessions, as well as refreshment and lunch for the days you attend.


Centre for Research on Families and Relationships

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